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Found 8 results

  1. The ALTO being the best seller for years had a free show across decades mainly because no one dared to play on this turf. Hyundai entered it with EON with a Sober engine and could not fight ALTO head on. Now we have a Alto Challenger in the pipe line which going by its specs looks promising. For Kayou, 1. Entry Hatch in a Crossover Guise - Indian always welcomes Higher GC cars. 2. CMF-A platform - Latest Technology , unlike Datsun GO, where they bring in dated models here. 3. Renault Design - Renault always great in this and comparing to Alto, this should be a looker. 4. AMT Promised. 5. No visible Cost Cutting. 6. Makes extraordinary sense of 2nd or 3rd car in the family. Against Kayou, 1. Renault AfSS Network - yet to grow. 2. No Diesel, though not a con, if had would been a bigger hit. 3. Yet to prove BR8 engine. 4. Tough to break "Entry Car- Maruti Car" Mind Set for first time buyers
  2. The most awaited new Maruti Alto 800 has been finally launched at a price of Rs. 2.44 lakhs for the base model Ex Showroom Delhi. The first scoop pictures of the Alto 800 were first seen exclusively on the Autocar India forum. The base trim gets standard features like grey interiors, vinyl seats, dual trip-meter and tubeless tyres, while the LX trim gets all these as well as fabric seats, air-conditioning and a remote fuel-lid opener. The top-end Alto 800 LXi comes with body-coloured bumpers and door handles, chrome-trim on front grille, full wheel-caps, grey or brown interior shade, silver-trim on inside door handles and speedometer, metallic finish on the steering wheel, remote opening for the hatch and internally adjustable ORVMs. This is the only variant that comes with an optional driver airbag; the lower variants will not have power windows or steering either. Maruti will also offer the Alto 800 with a factory-fitted CNG kit. Maruti has spent Rs 470 crores on developing the new Alto 800. 200 engineers have worked for 4 years to develop the new car and it has been done entirely in India. Maruti says that over 10,000 cars have been booked even before the launch. Looks like Maruti has hit the bulls eye once again. The new Alto 800 will be sold alongside the Maruti 800 (BS III markets only) and the Alto K10 Maruti Alto 800 prices: Petrol- base Rs 2.44L, LX-Rs 2.76L, LXI-Rs 2.99L, CNG- Base Rs 3.19L, LX-Rs 3.37L, LXI-Rs 3.56L (Ex-Delhi) I feel the pricing is spot on. Maruti is not called small car king for no reason. What do you think of the pricing Here is the ACI review for the new Alto 800: http://forum.autocar...aruti-alto-800/
  3. Alto, the once highest selling car in the Indian market, has scored a horrible 0 out of 5 in a recent LATAM NCAP ratings. The car was rendered totally unsafe in the event of a collision with a very unstable chassis and the A-Pillar, front door, B-Pillar, roof and floor pan buckling under the crash forces. It is high time that our government also establishes such testing procedures and minimum safety benchmarks as we have one of the highest motor accident fatality rate in the world.
  4. Got these pictures from a reliable source that this could be the 2014 Suzuki Alto for the international market. Looking at the pictures it does seem that the new car gets a tall boy stance. The whole profile looks very i10 like now. This could be the next gen A Star for India Internationally it will get the 1.0-litre Kseries petrol motor same as the current car. India could get a downsized version of the 1.3 Multijet. Atleast from the spy shots it looks better than the current A Star for sure Source: Autoblog.it
  5. ..this time it was planned. Dad was ready with some plan which I was completely unaware of. With 15 days left of my going back to Hyderabad and with the welcome shower of monsoon, we are out on roads, again. I was told that some sort of resort was pre booked in my absence and dad promised that it will be an experience that I never had. The packing started a day before and cameras were the top priority as we will experience a village like a village. So a village it was. Where? "About 150kms" How do we go ? "Easy, NH2 till Burdwan, then to a place called Bolpur" But we have already been to Bolpur !! "No, this isnt the Bolpur everyone visits, its beyond the reach of "Tagore" This was not the end of the trip. The plan was to reach a place called Murshidabad about 120km more from Bolpur where the last of the nawabs ruled in Bengal just before the British took control over bengal. (Yon can read about Bolpur and Murshidabad here http://www.bolpur-santiniketan.com/ and http://murshidabad.net/ )
  6. At one golden stage of my life, I used to think that only school- colleges are a daily affair and the office life is all about earning money and spending as you wish. So wrong I was !. Ever since I took admission in a B school in hyderabad I got myself separated from my beloved little car. The chance to get back to it came just a few days before when I was selected to work for a company as an intern for three months in Kolkata. Spicejet SG871 landed in NSCB airport exactly at 1:20pm and within 2 I reached home to find my car washed and ready to roll. For the last 1 year of my absence it ran just about 2000km. So, the very happy ME took it for a spin with tire pressure and engine checked. All oils topped and a layer of Formula1 polish was done on the same day. 30th morning was gloomy with light rain and dark clouds all over. I woke up around 8am and still felt lazy. Mom and Dad was discussing about how the last night's rain and dark clouds helped in lowering the heat level of Kolkata which was till day before some 38 degress or so and the discussion went ahead with past experiences of our tours where we experienced such weather. Soon my phone rang with a good news. No office on Monday !! So I had 30th 31st and 1st as holiday. "Should we leave?" Dad : "where?" Mom : " I am not ready!! The house maid is late and cooking not yet done ........ and so on" Dad : " But where . We wont get bookings online anywhere on weekends, that too at 9:30 am" and the search began. BCM touring and Team BHP search ended up with two likely place that we can reach by today even if we leave at 12pm max. Both Mom and Dad sounded happy if the place is good enough and we get to stay somewhere. The excited me started making phone calls. Chandipur in Orissa is a sea beach, and Maithon-Panchet dam in the state of Jharkhand is a half hill with hydel projects having beautiful lakes and scerenity. Bookings in the govt tourist bunglow is full at Chandipur, which is about 270kms from my home. One call in Hotel Shantinivas in maithon dam turned out positive. Distance was around 250kms. Suddenly all of us at home became super active and the necessary packing started. The house maid who arrived a bit late was asked to rush at things, lunch was light with some omission in items and we got ready for the sudden trip. The HP mini notebook and relinace netconnect plus was taken for assistance in road queries. and so we leave The map for Chandipur. To be continued ...
  7. ACI Review: Maruti Alto 800

    It’s not everyday that you get to test a car that’s likely to be a surefire best-seller, but that’s just what this is – a first drive of Maruti’s all-new Alto 800, a car that in all probability will start life at the top of the sales charts. The new Alto is a car Maruti has poured its heart and soul into to get right. What the company wants is continuity and progress. It wants the Alto 800 to take off from where the current Alto stands today, and for that Maruti’s designers have given it an identity that is instantly recognisable. So there’s an overriding feeling of familiarity as you walk upto the car. The compact dimensions, the high-mounted headlights and the thick ‘C’ pillar at the rear of the car tell you this is an Alto instantly. But the new bits stand out as well. The new two-part grille is attractive, the high-mounted petal-shaped headlights stand out, there’s a hint of a chin spoiler, which looks sporty, and the wheel arches are mildly flared as well. Unlike the earlier car, this one is mildly tipped forward too, adding to that sporty feel. The design is familiar around the back, but here too there are fresh new details like the crystal-like tail lights and some sculpting on the hatch that adds a spicy touch. What makes the car look a bit awkward from some angles however is the massive ground clearance, something that just doesn’t sit well with the compact dimensions. The conservative Alto 800 however is likely to appeal to a wider audience than Hyundai’s overtly styled Eon, which draws polarised opinion. The new Alto 800 is built on the same wheelbase as the earlier car and plenty of suspension bits are carried over, but the structure has been heavily modified to make it stiffer. Maruti’s engineers have concentrated on keeping it light too. The roof, for example, is made of thinner steel, but has corrugations for added rigidity. The biggest change however is in the cabin. There’s an all-new and more contemporary-looking dash, with a strong ‘V’ around the centre console, and plastic quality has been improved considerably. There are plenty of silver accents in the cabin, and there’s a horizontally aligned bottle holder placed ahead of the gear lever, which is quite innovative. The inclusion of new slimmer seats means there is marginally more space for passengers but this is a car that’s hard to get comfortable in. The small front seats with their integrated headrests, for example, lack decent back support and the rear-seat back isn’t too comfortable either. Space is also only marginally better than the current car, which means it’s very cramped, especially in the rear. The moulded roof lining and fully clad pillars however improve the ambience of the cabin tremendously. There are big changes under the bonnet as well. Maruti may continue to call this 800cc motor the F8D but changes made are quite far-reaching. There are new short skirt pistons, the compression ratio of the engine has been increased and the air inlet system has been made longer. Torque as a result is 11 percent better, and you can feel it. Push down on the accelerator and the Alto 800 sets off in a much more determined manner. Responses at low engine speed have always been a strength of this motor, and now it’s better. You don’t need to rev hard to get a move on and you can upshift quite early, so overtaking is not as much a challenge as before. At very low revs, there’s a jerky throttle action, which is typical of other Maruti motors as well and hence driving in bumper-to-bumper traffic is not very smooth. Out on the highway, the improved motor feels more eager thanks to improved performance at the top end of the rev range. In fact, there’s a sporty note at higher revs and the engine doesn’t feel as thrashy as before. The gearbox too has been improved over the earlier car with a new cable type shifter. The gearshift is fairly smooth but it still doesn’t have the precision or crisp action of more contemporary competition. The ride is simply outstanding for such a small car and it copes admirably well with everything that’s thrown at it. The Alto 800’s tall springs and 80 profile tyres absorb potholes and ruts with ease but as expected, the Alto 800 is never as well settled as a bigger car. There is always a nervous bit of vertical movement when the road gets uneven, but it’s not to the point of being uncomfortable. When it comes to driving pleasure the Alto 800 really won’t excite you. There’s no excess of power for one, and the handling is pretty soggy too. The steering feels a bit vague, especially around the straight-ahead position, and the car doesn’t like to be cornered hard. But then, the kind of person who is buying this car isn’t going to really care. The new Alto 800 may not have the same modern feel as the Hyundai Eon but certainly feels a generation ahead of the previous Alto with better interiors, dynamics and performance. It’s a claimed 15 percent more efficient than the earlier car (at 22.74kpl) and it looks more contemporary too. Is that enough to keep its popularity sky-high? That will finally depend on the price. However, assuming a Rs 3.15 lakh sticker for the base, air-con-equipped version, Maruti’s latest will continue to be the best-selling car on Indian soil after it goes on sale on October 16 this year. See the full photo gallery here: http://www.autocarin...alto-800,1.aspx
  8. Hyundai is readying the replacement for the i10 and proof of this comes from the first-ever spy pictures of the car being tested on Indian soil. Though heavily disguised, it looks longer and wider than the current car and the silhouette of the grille behind the cladding suggests the new i10 follows Hyundai's ‘Fluidic’ design theme. Other clues pointing to this are the swept-back headlights, the low, elongated chin and the rising shoulder line. Top-end variants could get alloy wheels and rear parking sensors as well as fog lamps as standard equipment.