anish88

Changing Tyres: Can kicking the tyres be avoided?

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So today I had a flat in my Getz GLS - the rear left. I had alignment done 2 months back and I noticed then that the guy taking out the tyres kicked it for the tyre to come off. I did ask him why and he said that there is rust. Now today, I had a really tough time in getting the tyre to come off and had to kick it quite a bit for it to finally come off. Question here is whether this can be avoided. Is there a way through which this job becomes easier? Maybe anti-rust treatment? Any ideas/suggestions?

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A metal primer coating can be applied after scraping all the rust and cleaning  the upper rim part thats is contact with the tyre/tube.This part usually gets rusted very fast but remains hidden and unseen as long as one does not dismantle the tyre/tube.

Thereafter, an enamel paint or still better any good automotive paint (preferably of the rim colour) can be applied over the dried primer coat.Automotive paints dry up very fast and can also be applied with an ordinary paint brush.You do not require that gleaming finish on that portion of the rim as its hidden so there's no need of spray painting. This application gives the rim a longer life and prevents such tyre/tube rim messing up.

anjan_c20072009-12-02 12:01:47

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@anjan - I don't think Anish is talking about the tyre sidewall sticking to the rim.

I think his problem is that the wheel wouldn't come out after he removed the nuts to change the wheel with the spare one.

@anish - do you have steel rims or alloys ? Did you notice any rust anywhere after removing the wheel. This does happen sometimes but I wouldn't worry too much (unless you see a lot of rust someplace).

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In such cases use of WD-40 SPRAY, a rust/ tightened nuts/bolts releaser can be used -its very effective.These come in pressurised containers.

Also from time to time its advisable to loosen nuts of wheels and apply oil to keep the threads working and not getting jammed. Two checks per year-a post monsoon check-up every year, and then again once is sufficient.

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If using WD-40, there's no need to open the bolts periodically - it permeates well.

Also remember that its a flammable product - don't spray it on when you wheels are hot after a drive.

Using WD-40 isn't really needed on steel rims of a new car. I wouldn't advise it unless the thread starter has alloys with aftermarket chrome plated lug nuts that rust fast.

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dtandon: I am talking of a chronic problem and if there's metal jamming WD40 is the remedy. And since I've already mentioned its in a pressurised can, one must understand that its not to be used on hot surfaces.

For prevention I have suggested the remedy, that the nuts and bolts need to be lubricated periodically.If this is done periodically, WD 40 may have a minimal role.

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I have steel rims, no alloys. There is rusting around the bolts, pretty much a pattern which goes in a circle minus the bolts. Almost seems as if the rust patch is exactly where the rim meets the brakepad (?). I live in Lajpat Nagar which has a mini car market and off late, I've seen more and more people getting the same part painted. Maybe it's more than just ornamental. How much would that set me back by? Estimates?

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