Brn2Crz

Keeping Cool

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Keeping the engine cool is one of the best ways to save fuel and get extra power. 

 

1. Depending on your situation, replace the exhaust with a larger tube on the order of 5cm to 7cm diameter.  This allows hot gas to exit faster carrying that waste heat away. 

 

2. If you've got the cash, have the exhaust manifold ceramic coated. (or purchase a set of headers that have already been plasma coated.)  That lowers underhood temperatures more than 60f.  For every 30f drop in intake air temp you get an extra horse or two.

 

 

Cooler is better and there are a million ways to slice a mango. 

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You can reach coolness by replacing the fan assembly with a larger, more efficient unit. Here are some suggestions:

1.  Replace the factory battery with the largest you can fit into your ride.

 

2.  Replace the radiator with an aftermarket unit with a greater heat transfer factor.

 

3.  Replace the fan assembly (they come matched for that larger radiator).

 

4. Upgrade the radiator fluid or add a bit of wetting agent.

 

I know it's getting a bit spendy but these are just suggestions.

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Ok. Firstly, you dont need these things to keep your car cool. There is an internal combustion engine which gives out heat. you cant help it. its as simple as that. Yes, you can keep the car cooler with a bigger radiator or a bigger intercooler, you can also have a nozzle which spurts out cold water on the radiator as the car is moving along (like in some high performance sports cars, etc.)

The Exhaust mod on the other had will just have a massive drop in power if the diameter is that big. Passenger cars are usually 1-1.5 inches in diameter. If you have a 4 inch pipe or something, it will result in MASIVE power losses.

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Why keep the engine cooler?  Better fuel efficiency, less wear and tear on engine parts and more power.  Keep in mind that the radiator is at the end of the thermal transfer chain.  In hot climates, such as India, the engine block runs measurably higher temperatures which "cook out" the oil and produce the vapor which leaves that lovely brown varnish everywhere.  A stock radiator operates in a narrow temperature band.  The lower limit governed by the thermostat and the higher by the radiators thermal transfer characteristic.  Simply put....a better radiator keeps the engine within better, more moderate operational  range.

 

Intercoolers are used to cool the intake air so it's denser to deliver more l/m to get more power.

 

Exhaust exhaust exhaust....I like short, large, unrestricted pipes that get the gas out as quick as possible to give me more power.  Imagine wedging a potato up the exhaust pipe.  The engine now has zero power.  Unfortuneately, short pipes make too much noise.  The alternative is to use a larger tube to reduce flow restrictions.  This lowers temperatures, increases power and decreases the creation of NOx with  help from the cat.

 

In summary...keeping cool means more power and less wear.

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 To carry on......Get a bigger oil cooler (if you already have one) or get one installed, if you don't.  The lubrication system works on splash, pressure and splash/pressure ways to keep everything slippery.  Imagine the sun as the cylinder and the earth as the radiator.  The temperature at the cylinder wall, head and lower assembly is like the sun...I mean really, really hot because it is really, really close and so it cracks the oil.  The radiator is far away and can release the average block heat but it can't help the oil that's getting superheated.  An oil cooler gets that under control and a number of other boring things so that the oil can do its job.

 

Keeping cool means more power in a big way if the underhood temperatures can be kept low, low, low because the intake air is denser leading to a better mixture in the cylinders.

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I personally think for any normally driven car what the manufacturer designs in is enough. Problems may arise, due to failed water pumps, failed thermostats, failed switches for the cooling fan, fan motor failure and also badly clogged radiators / condensers. The latter are quite common, and a good pressure wash may be all than is needed.

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@Friends:

I think there is no need to put anything in the car for the cooling purposes,what is available is enough.Its better you take care of it,then why to think of aftermarket fitments.I am sure none of us always keep our rides redlined,in fact many of us have not even once touched the redline once in their driving life.Then why to install anything after market?I'd say that just take care of what you have.

One instance:

My friend was continuously complaining of the over-heating in his Lancer Cedia.He bought some anything from market as a remedy,and when I inspected the car,what I found was insufficiency of everything in the car...now what to do of those fitments?

I often drive my Innova from Meerut to Jaipur(387 km),to Amritsar(about 600 km), to Lucknow(about 500km),Varansi,Jodhpur etc etc .I can bet that not even a single car overtakes me on the way and even after such long continuous and fast runs I have never faced overheating problem.

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@sg can you kindly tell me what the water pump is????and what it pups?i do know that it is turned by the ambelt1

In every water cooled engine there is a small pump, driven by the belt which circulates the water from the engine into the radiator and heating system. If this packs up then the engine will overheat since the hot water is not pumped out.

The good  'ol FIAT was notorious for blowing a water pump every two years or so.

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I'm laughing here because sqiitk is so, so right.  Fiats were notorious head benders.  In the spirit of keeping cool, there are several addtional advantages to chilling the ride in the form of longer transmission and a/c life.  The transmission soaks the heat directly from the block and whether you're an automatic or manual it gets pretty dicy when the temperature is up.  Automatics are the worse because the automatic fluid breaks down easily at temperature.  It's a historic thing that dates back around 30 years or so concerning the formulation.  In manuals, I see cooked throwouts and shaft seal blowouts resulting in having to replace the entire clutch assembly and end seal. Collateral damage extends down the chain to the CV hub.

 

The a/c simply can't keep up at high underhood temperatures.  It can't keep balance (thank you 134a) and finally the compressor will catch a single drop and make that horrible "clank" sound.  Then you get to drain out the "black" liquid of death (134 contaminated with oil) from the whole system.  What a mess.

 

Anyway, keeping cool saves money especially in hot climates.  Remember that coolness does not mean freezing.  It means keeping within the operational band.

 

Lastly, sqiitk,  you have certainly been around.  The Fiat would wear the front bushing slightly out of round, let just a little drop of water out the hole which trashesthe bearing causing it to seize and stop and break the belt whipping it around the engine compartment, fracture the pulley and in some cases fly the fan through the radiator.  hahahahah  That happened to me ...twice.

 

 

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IMHO, Car manufacturer provided Technical systems(Cooling system here) are designed enough to tackle the worst of the conditions experienced ever by car owners unless it hasn't been altered/mismanaged by its owner i.e using water instead of coolants, etc.

Can't imagine even what the Taxi drivers do with their Indicas.

Following extra practices will lead to adverse consequences like; Loss of output power & excessive emissions incase of free flow/wider exhausts.

Driving carefully, Servicing the car at proper intervals with use of Genuine parts always is the key to longer life of your machinery.

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That exhaust pipe is so tricky!  Short, non-restrictive, ceramic coated pipes (5 - 7cm dia for 250 h/p) with tuned ceramic coated headers provide maximum optimization for the exhaust system.  What about little engines?  The length of the system is determined by the distance to the back of the car and the diameter of the pipe is determined by "how cheap can we make it", "can we make emission limits", and "how much space to we have".  When the word "bigger" is used, it means in the range of 5 to 7cm in diameter.  So what makes a larger tube better?  You tune it..oh yes..you have to calculate gas flow rates factoring in rpm, cat, muffler, ambient temperature, egts, normal barometric pressure and a host of other things, such as wave propagation, to design the exhaust system that will actually "suck" the gas out of the engine.  This will yield on the order of 2-3 h/p more and keep  under hood temps cooler.  Wow  this is a super simplified explanation.  Is it worth the money?  Well, specialty shops have already worked out the math and the fabrication so it's up to  you. 

The ROI depends on your purpose and usage. 

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Keeping the engine cool is one of the best ways to save fuel and get extra power.

1. Depending on your situation, replace the exhaust with a larger tube on the order of 5cm to 7cm diameter. This allows hot gas to exit faster carrying that waste heat away.

2. If you've got the cash, have the exhaust manifold ceramic coated. (or purchase a set of headers that have already been plasma coated.) That lowers underhood temperatures more than 60f. For every 30f drop in intake air temp you get an extra horse or two.

Cooler is better and there are a million ways to slice a mango.

I agree with you and I appreciate those things and thank you for giving me some great information. This tips is very useful for me and follow this.

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