brijesh41183

turbo and intercooler cleaning

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Don't worry about the turbocharger, till then its functional there's no need for its Cleaning, instead its a Ir-repairable part of the engine & its not advised to mess with it either.

In defective cases, its Replacement is advisable.

Only Practice to save & extend the life of Turbocharger & Intercooler is by;

-Running the car at Idle for 1 minute, atleast 1 minute before moving & Switching off the engine.

-Keeping its Air-filter & its Hose as much as clean & dry as possible.

-Timely replacement of the Air filter at Intervals specified by Maruti Suzuki.

-Avoiding Direct Water Spray/entry onto the Air Intake.

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Life of a turbo is expected to be around 75k to 100k kms. But poor construction and poor maintenance can shorten life. Cost of turbo is high. Ranges from 60k to 85k depending upon car. For swift I guess it is around 70-75k. 

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The best way to maintain the turbo is to idle after a long trip or after a spirited driving for 30 secs . At the start you donot need to idle for long , just drive slowly for 1-2 kms till the engine warms-up . <-This should be followed with every car though.

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Turbos need clean air so keep that filter clean! 

There are several ways to keep up with turbo aging although they are a bit more technically involved.  The first is to install an EGT meter.  I can't stress how important it is to know your environment and driving habits to avoid an over-temp condition at the exhaust.

When the engine is cold you can pull off the turbo and feel the turbine blade tips.  If they are rounding tor deformed, you've exceeded temp.  Spin the turbine blades with your finger ever-so-slowly to ensure that rotation is smooth through 360 degrees.  If you feel the slightest pause then the shaft or bearings are gone.  There are kits to rebuild turbos. 

I inject a minute amount of UV dye to spot hairline fractures in the exhaust manifold and turbo housing.  This also allows you to spot leaks on the pressure side of the intake. 

Having a boost gauge will help keep the pop-off calibration honest.   Use a digital IR thermometer to keep check on the input/output differential.

Make sure to chart mixture vs rpm throughout  the range.  Once again we're getting a bit techie here.  Remember that it is the mixture that destroys turbos.

Last, but not absolute, make sure to check for down-line exhaust restrictions.

If you are a motor head, we can wire up the computer and run diagnostics and calibration....but that is mostly for enthusiasts, racing and research.

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I think if you do not face any pickup or performance problems, leave the turbo alone and do not heed to recommendations from the service. This, along with any combustion gases that might make it past the piston rings, reduce its effectiveness, thus affecting performance.

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